Fossil Collection at Port Royal American History Museum

Did you know whales have ear bones, that coprolite is another name for prehistoric “poop,” or that we have fossilized sea shells in the mountains of Virginia? You can find all of these things and more in the new Virginia Fossil Display at the museum. Come see our state fossil, prehistoric sperm whale teeth and those of giant sharks over 40 feet long, tiny fossilized crabs and teeth of ancient pigs. Most of these fossils have been found less than an hour from the museum, and many from Caroline County! The fossils, ranging from 5 million years ago to 550 million years ago, are on loan from the collection of Joe, Trish and John Parker. It is dedicated to their friend and fellow fossil hunter Joshua Jordan. Josh and John hunted together for many years until Josh’s death in 2017. Most of the collection on display comes from the Miocene Era when Caroline County and the surrounding area was thought to be a warm shallow sea where mother whales came to have their babies. This drew the giant shark, megalodon, and other predators of the time. That’s why many whale fossils and sharks teeth can be found in the quarries and rivers of our area. See it all on opening day Saturday, Sept. 28 from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Or call 804/370-5285 for an appointment.

Did you know whales have ear bones, that coprolite is another name for prehistoric “poop,” or that we have fossilized sea shells in the mountains of Virginia?

You can find all of these things and more in the new Virginia Fossil Display at the museum. Come see our state fossil, prehistoric sperm whale teeth and those of giant sharks over 40 feet long, tiny fossilized crabs and teeth of ancient pigs.

Most of these fossils have been found less than an hour from the museum, and many are from Caroline County.

The fossils, ranging from 5 million years ago to 550 million years ago, are on loan from the collection of Joe, Trish and John Parker. It is dedicated to their friend and fellow fossil hunter Joshua Jordan. Josh and John hunted together for many years until Josh’s death in 2017.

Most of the collection on display comes from the Miocene era when Caroline County and the surrounding area was thought to be a warm shallow sea where mother whales came to have their babies. This drew the giant shark, megalodon, and other predators of the time. That’s why many whale fossils and sharks teeth can be found in the quarries and rivers of our area.

See it all on opening day Saturday, Sept. 28 from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Or call 804/370-5285 for an appointment.

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